Novel use of procedures to avoid scrutiny

Saatchi’s Medical Innovation Bill (more properly titled the unfounded novel use, irresponsible human experimentation and removal of redress Bill) was not, in the end, rushed through in the last parliament, despite the best attempts of Lord Saatchi to use his weight and talents to create extra time and special rules. In his shock that this, sanctioned by the conservatives, was not going to work out, he proclaimed that Nick Clegg was a nasty murderous sort with blood on his hands, and had handed down a death sentence to patients.

All Nick et al had done was say, hang on a minute – medical organisations, patient charities and medical defence orgs don’t want the Bill, patient safety experts and legal experts are up in arms abut the Bill, and Wales unanimously condemned it, and were quite horrified by it. Perhaps we shouldn’t rush this dangerous and widely condemned draft legislation in these circumstances and instead it warrants detailed scrutiny, at best, and certainly not to be pushed through in this cavalier fashion because of who Saatchi is how much power he wields or how much he donates.

Who he is does not make it right to risk (limitless) patients’ lives, safety, dignity and their quality of life.

Saatchi’s crew then went flat out trying to pressure the Lib Dems to cave in to the Conservative deal to allow this monster of a danger to be passed without any scrutiny by deploying the tried and tested setting up of petitions and shouting in the press at a crucial pinch point before the election. Thankfully the Lib Dems had more integrity, and some very sensible MPs who understood science. (Though Sarah Wollaston is a stalwart of sense, she has not been listened to by her own party – and has found herself surrounded by some extraordinarily inept characters.)

At the HealthWatch public debate on the Bill held at King’s College London in March, Nigel Poole QC and Nick Ross spelled out the problems with irrefutable clarity and sense.

Alas clarity, sense, science and integrity are being challenged once more by the undead Bill, raised from the ground and re-entering the House of Lords on the 8th June.

Worse still, the attempt to limit scrutiny and avert the gaze of noble Lords who may know what they are talking about has gone to new lengths. Lord Saatchi has given notice to the House to agree a motion that Standing Order 46 (no two stages of a Bill to be taken on one day) be dispensed with, allowing the Bill, which would need to be identical to that which left the Lords, to career straight through to the Commons without any stages of examination by learned peers, and be pushed through on the nod. If there’s one thing we need, it is proper scrutiny, particularly in light of the overwhelming opposition to the Bill from those who know what they are talking about, including those in parliament and experts in patient safety such as Sir Francis QC and Sir Ian Kennedy QC.

More info: Stop the Saatchi Bill

politics.co.uk and openDemocracy

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